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 Fly Fishing Reports

 Fly Fishing Tips - Colorado Fishing Report

fly day

Trout Stocking Schedules Reg 1 - Reg 2 - Reg 3 - Reg 4 - Reg 5

Arkansas and White river levels are available at: http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=lzk
For real-time information on stream flow in Arkansas from the U.S. Geological Survey, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/rt 
For water quality statistics (including temperature) in many Arkansas streams and lakes, visit: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ar/nwis/current/?type=quality  

June 16, 2017 - White River - Submitted by Berry Brothers Guides - JOHN BERRY FISHING REPORT 6/16/2017

During the past week, we have had a minor rain event (just a trace here in Cotter), warmer temperatures and moderate winds. The lake level at Bull Shoals remained steady at twenty seven and seven tenths feet above seasonal power pool of 662 feet. This is five and three tenths feet below the top of flood pool. Upstream, Table Rock fell one and four tenths feet to rest at seven and two tenths feet above seasonal power pool and six and eight tenths feet above the top of flood pool. Beaver Lake fell two tenths of a foot to rest at seven and three tenths feet above seasonal power pool and one and three tenths feet below the top of flood pool. On the White, we had no wadable water with more moderate generation. Norfork Lake fell seven tenths of a foot to rest at seventeen and six tenths feet above seasonal power pool of 556.72 feet and five and four tenths feet below the top of flood pool. On the Norfork, we had limited wadable water.

Seasonal power pool has been reset for the lakes in the White River system. All of the lakes in the White River System are now below the top of flood pool. The Corps of Engineers has closed the flood gates on all of the lakes in the White River system. We should expect a lot of generation, with some wadable water in the near future.

On the White, the hot spot has been Rim Shoals. The hot flies were olive woolly buggers (#8, #10), Y2Ks (#14, #12), prince nymphs (#14), zebra midges (black with silver wire and silver bead or red with silver wire and silver bead #16, #18), pheasant tails (#14), ruby midges (#18), root beer midges (#18), pink and cerise San Juan worms (#10), and sowbugs (#16). Double fly nymph rigs have been very effective (my current favorite is a hare and copper nymph (#14) with a ruby midge (#18) suspended below it). Use lots of lead and long leaders to get your flies down

The Buffalo National River and Crooked Creek are navigable. With the warmer weather the smallmouths are more active. My favorite fly is a Clouser minnow. Carefully check the water level before entering Crooked Creek or the Buffalo River. There are no dams on these streams. They both have large drainages and are prone to flooding during and following any rain event. The water can rise very quickly.

On the Norfork, the water is stained. It fishes well one day and poorly the next. Navigate this stream with caution as things have changed a bit during the recent flooding. There has been major gravel recruitment at the bottom of Mill Pond and the dock hole. The most productive flies have been small midge patterns (#18, #20, #22)  like ruby midges, root beer midges, zebra midges (black or red with silver wire and silver bead) and soft hackles (#14, #16) like the green butt. Egg patterns have also been productive. Double fly nymph rigs have been very effective. Try a small bead headed nymph (zebra midge, copper John or pheasant tail) suspended eighteen inches below a brightly colored San Juan worm (hot fluorescent pink or cerise #10). The fishing is better in the morning. My favorite rig has been a cerise San Juan worm with a ruby midge dropper.

Dry Run Creek has been affected by the flooding but has returned to its banks and is fishing well. The hot flies have been sowbugs (#14), Y2Ks (#12) and various colored San Juan worms (worm brown, red, hot fluorescent pink and cerise #10). While you are at the creek you should visit the Norfork National Fish Hatchery. It is fascinating. Be sure and remove your waders before entering to prevent the spread of aquatic diseases.

The Spring River is high and off color. This is a great place to wade fish, when they are running water on the White and Norfork Rivers. Canoe season is on and there many boats on the river. Be sure to wear cleated boots and carry a wading staff. There is a lot of bedrock that can get very slick. The hot flies have been olive woolly buggers with a bit of flash (#10), cerise and hot pink San Juan worms (#10) and Y2Ks (#10).

Remember that the White and Norfork Rivers and Dry Run Creek are infected with didymo, an invasive alga. Be sure and thoroughly clean and dry your waders (especially the felt soles on wading boots) before using them in any other water. Many manufacturers are now making rubber soled wading boots that are easier to clean and are not as likely to harbor didymo.

John Berry is a fly fishing guide in Cotter, Arkansas and has fished our local streams for over thirty years.

THINGS ARE GETTING BACK TO NORMAL
BY JOHN BERRY
We have had a tough spring this year on our trout streams. We have had some of the heaviest spring rains that I can remember. At the beginning of the year all, of the lakes, in the White River system, were well below the top of power pool. We were enjoying wadable water on both the White and Norfork Rivers. Now, after the heavy rains we received, which resulted in flooding, on the Norfork and White Rivers, the lake levels are at or near the top of flood pool.

During the flooding water was held back in the lakes. Once the flooding downstream had receded, the Corps of Engineers opened the flood gates on all, of the dams, on the White River System, in order to lower the lakes a bit, to prevent them from failing. During the flooding the conditions were not safe. There was a lot of debris floating down stream and most, if not all, of the launch ramps were closed. When the flood gates were open some of the ramps were open and the rivers were not as perilous but the water level was so high that it was difficult to fish.

I did not fish during the flooding but I fished the White and Norfork during the heavy water levels brought on by the flood gates. It was tough and I am glad it is over. Long leaders and heavy weight were the rule of the day. We caught trout but there were no easy days.

In the past week, conditions have improved, on both rivers. The flood gates have been closed, on all of the dams, and the water levels, on our rivers, are lower. The ramps are all open, the rivers are all navigable and fishing has improved. To top it off there is even a little wadable water. I guided both rivers this week and did well.

On Monday, I fished the White, at Rim Shoals. I was pleased, to see the river, at a very productive level. The water was running at about 8,800 cubic feet per second. This is the rough equivalent, of just under three full generators. There was enough water for me to easily navigate the water with my conventional outboard powered by a propeller. At this water level, the fishing was much easier. We could use leaders that were shorter. Even more important, we could use less lead. This made the casting much easier. We caught plenty of trout and enjoyed the day.

The next day we fished the Norfork. My clients were staying at a cabin on the river. I checked the prediction and noted that we would have a brief window of wadable water early, in the morning. We were, on the river, at 7:30 AM. It was, on the bottom, and still stained, from the flooding earlier, in the year. We found the river to be greatly changed. Places that used to be bedrock were graveled in. Spots that were previously gravel bottomed were now bedrock. I must say that my wading staff was indispensable, as I navigated through this new environment.

The fishing was pretty good. We managed to land a sixteen inch brook trout. This is the largest brook that one of my clients has ever landed. I caught a nineteen incher, on my own, but that was twenty years ago. Since then my best has been a fourteen. The water came up and we launched my boat. We floated the Norfork. The going was slow but we still managed to land a fat twenty four inch brown. The cutthroat eluded us so we did not get the grand slam. All in all, it was a good day, with two trophies landed.

If you have not been out you should try it. Things are back to normal.

 
Missouri Trout Parks June 1, 2017
Bennett Spring State Park


Information: Park 417-532-4418
Water Surface Temp: 61º
Water Level (Range): normal
Water Type: dingy
Fish Reported:
Rainbow Trout: Good
Brown Trout: Fair
zone 1 and 2 popular lures: shell and brown, white and peach, gingersnap, or shell and white marabou, brown copper hot shot, John Deere mini jig or angry Deere, chartreuse, white with pink dot, or Jimi Hendrix glo balls ; Zone 3 popular baits: yellow, chartreuse, lime green, or salmon peach Power Baits, orange worms; June Fishing hours are from 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.; June weed cutting is scheduled for June 28-29; cutting will begin in Zone 3 and move upstream; remember that all brown trout less than 15" in length must be returned to the water immediately; for up-to-date stream conditions check USGS water data website at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?06923500; trout cam - https://mostateparks.com/content/trout-cam; Kids Free Fishing Day is rescheduled for Saturday June 10th. Kids 15 years old and younger fish for free within the park. Fishing is from 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Exhibits are from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00p.m.; Free Fishing weekend is June 10-11. For more information, please contact Bennett Spring Hatchery at 417-532-4418.
(Reported on: 5/29/17)

Maramec Spring Park


Information: 573-265-7801
Water Surface Temp: 57º
Water Level (Range): normal
Water Type: clear
Fish Reported:
Rainbow Trout: Good
Brown Trout: Fair
water flow is back to normal and slightly murkey; fishing has been very good within the park; the best fishing times are the first couple of hours shortly after the morning whistle, as well as in the evening, but fish can be caught throughout the day if you change locations when fishing slows down; fish are biting very light so use a small float; very light line is key to success, 2-4 lb test is preferred; fish are hitting doughbaits in white, salmon peach, and hatchery brown colors when fished on a small treble hook and suspended under a float; Rooster Tails in black/white, green, brown, and purple; plastic worms in orange, yellow, white, and red have all been proving good; remember that all brown trout less than 15" in length must be returned to the water immediately; Fishing times for the month of June are 6:30 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.
(Reported on: 6/1/17)

Montauk State Park


Information: 573-548-2585
Water Surface Temp: 56º
Water Level (Range): falling
Water Type: clear
Fish Reported:
Rainbow Trout: Good
the river is at 2.42 feet; stocking has resumed in select locations throughout the park; more areas will be stocked as stocking roads are continuing to be repaired; fish are being caught throughout the park in all zones; spinners such as Rooster Tails (single hook) are effective throughout the park; if fishing nymphs, added weight may be necessary due to above average flows; olive or black streamers are effective in the fly-only zone; gold tencil, white, and chartreuse jigs have also been working in all zones; all colors of doughbait have been effective in the bait areas; for up-to-date stream conditions, check USGS water data website at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?07064440.
(Reported on: 5/30/17)

Roaring River State Park


Information: 417-847-2430
Water Surface Temp: 58º
Water Level (Range): falling
Water Type: dingy
Fish Reported:
Rainbow Trout: Good
we received three inches of rain again for the second weekend and experienced another flood event; the river came up about two and a half feet; little damage was done to the stream but the water has returned to a very dingy color; fishing will be almost the same as last week; the dry fly fishing will slowly come back; right now we are fishing dark wooly buggers, prince nymphs, copper johns, lightning bugs, small gold jigs, small thread jigs, and brassies, with large dry flies taking a few here and there; the fish are still reacting to a hopper or beetle, in some areas, where there is a bit of slow water, glo balls, and the San Juan worms in bright orange and red are also working; buggers with extra mylar in the tails are working good, use 5x and 6x; the water is still up a bit and the use of Power Bait is recommended if you just want to catch a fast limit of trout, the orange, fluorescent yellow and white are all good in the eggs; if you are using the worms, the orange peel, orange, cheese yellow, and chartreuse are all working; small gold spoons are good if you fish them deep and slow; small spinnerbaits still work fine, you may need to add a bit of lead to get them down deep enough; jigs are catching fish, 1/32 and larger are best, but a few people have been catching trout on the white and olive micro jig; larger jigs are working best, in the darker colors, olive, black, black/yellow, and dark brown have all been working well; in this type of water the use of 4 lb. and 3 lb. line is recommended; as the water clears, we will go back to the 2 lb. line; if you go into Zone 3, nightcrawlers and minnows would be good choices or any of the bright-colored Power Baits should work.
(Reported on: 5/30/17)

Trout Stocking

Trout Stocking

The Conservation Department stocks trout in each of the trout parks every evening from the day before the March 1 opener through Oct. 30. Tag sale estimates determine a daily stocking rate average of 2.25 fish per expected angler. Except on opening day, three fish are stocked for every expected angler. From March 1 to Oct. 31, the parks will collectively sell more than 400,000 tags and stock more than 900,000 fish. These fish will average about 12 inches long over the season, but some variation occurs. Dozens of lunkers weighing upwards of 3 pounds are stocked each year. A few tip the scales at more than 10 pounds.

 

May 27, 2017 - White River - Submitted by Berry Brothers Guides - JOHN BERRY FISHING REPORT 5/26/2017

During the past week, we have had a rain event (about an inch here in Cotter), warm temperatures and moderate winds. The lake level at Bull Shoals rose six tenths of a foot to rest at thirty and six tenths feet above seasonal power pool of 662 feet. This is two and four tenths feet below the top of flood pool. The Corps of Engineers has opened seventeen flood gates to release 13,300 cubic feet per second to augment generation and lower the lake. Upstream, Table Rock rose one foot to rest at eleven and one tenth feet above seasonal power pool and three and one tenth feet above the top of flood pool. The Corps of Engineers has opened flood gates to release 9,800 cubic feet per second to augment generation and lower the lake. Beaver Lake rose one tenth of a foot to rest at seven and seven tenths feet above seasonal power pool and nine tenths of a foot below the top of flood pool. On the White, we had no wadable water with high generation. Norfork Lake rose five tenths of a foot to rest at twenty and seven tenths feet above seasonal power pool of 556.75 feet and two and five tenths feet below the top of flood pool. The Corps of Engineers has closed the flood gates and returned the dam to normal generation.  On the Norfork, we had some wadable water at night and early morning.

Seasonal power pool has been reset for the lakes in the White River system. All of the lakes in the White River System are now below the top of flood pool. We should expect a lot of generation with little if any wadable water in the near future.

On the White, the water below Crooked Creek and the Buffalo has cleared up. The hot flies were olive woolly buggers (#8, #10), Y2Ks (#14, #12), prince nymphs (#14), zebra midges (black with silver wire and silver bead or red with silver wire and silver bead #16, #18), pheasant tails (#14), ruby midges (#18), root beer midges (#18), pink and cerise San Juan worms (#10), and sowbugs (#16). Double fly nymph rigs have been very effective (my current favorite is a hare and copper nymph (#14) with a ruby midge (#18) suspended below it). Use lots of lead and long leaders to get your flies down

The Buffalo National River and Crooked Creek are navigable but high. With the warmer weather the smallmouths should be more active. My favorite fly is a Clouser minnow. Carefully check the water level before entering Crooked Creek or the Buffalo River. There are no dams on these streams. They both have large drainages and are prone to flooding during and following any rain event. The water can rise very quickly.

On the Norfork there was flooding but the river is back in its banks and the flood gates have been closed. Navigate this stream with caution as things have changed a bit during the recent flooding. There has been major gravel recruitment at the bottom of Mill Pond and the dock hole. The most productive flies have been small midge patterns (#18, #20, #22)  like ruby midges, root beer midges, zebra midges (black or red with silver wire and silver bead) and soft hackles (#14, #16) like the green butt. Egg patterns have also been productive. Double fly nymph rigs have been very effective. Try a small bead headed nymph (zebra midge, copper John or pheasant tail) suspended eighteen inches below a brightly colored San Juan worm (hot fluorescent pink or cerise #10). The fishing is better in the morning. My favorite rig has been a hare and copper nymph with a ruby midge dropper.

Dry Run Creek has been affected by the flooding but has returned to its banks. The hot flies have been sowbugs (#14), Y2Ks (#12) and various colored San Juan worms (worm brown, red, hot fluorescent pink and cerise #10). While you are at the creek you should visit the Norfork National Fish Hatchery. It is fascinating. Be sure and remove your waders before entering to prevent the spread of aquatic diseases.

The Spring River is fishing well. This is a great place to wade fish, when they are running water on the White and Norfork Rivers. Canoe season is on and there many boats on the river. Be sure to wear cleated boots and carry a wading staff. There is a lot of bedrock that can get very slick. The hot flies have been olive woolly buggers with a bit of flash (#10), cerise and hot pink San Juan worms (#10) and Y2Ks (#10).

Remember that the White and Norfork Rivers and Dry Run Creek are infected with didymo, an invasive alga. Be sure and thoroughly clean and dry your waders (especially the felt soles on wading boots) before using them in any other water. Many manufacturers are now making rubber soled wading boots that are easier to clean and are not as likely to harbor didymo.

John Berry is a fly fishing guide in Cotter, Arkansas and has fished our local streams for over thirty years.

Missouri Trout Parks May 18, 2017

Bennett Spring State Park


Information: Park 417-532-4418
Water Surface Temp: 61º
Water Level (Range): normal
Water Type: dingy
Fish Reported:
Rainbow Trout: Good
Brown Trout: Fair
zone 1 and 2 popular lures: red and black, white and red, gingersnap, or shell and white marabou, Bennett Blue crackleback, John Deere mini jig or angry Deere; Zone 3 popular baits: yellow or salmon peach Power Baits, florescent orange grubs Power Bait, orange and white worms; May fishing hours are from 6:30 a.m. to 8:15 p.m., June Fishing hours are from 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.; June weed cutting is scheduled for June 28-29; cutting will begin in Zone 3 and move upstream; remember that all brown trout less than 15" in length must be returned to the water immediately; for up-to-date stream conditions check USGS water data website at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?06923500; trout cam - https://mostateparks.com/content/trout-cam; Kids Free Fishing Day is rescheduled for Saturday June 10th. Kids 15 years old and younger fish for free within the park. Fishing is from 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Exhibits are from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00p.m.; Free Fishing weekend is June 10-11. For more information, please contact Bennett Spring Hatchery at 417-532-4418.
(Reported on: 5/24/17)

Maramec Spring Park


Information: 573-265-7801
Water Surface Temp: 57º
Water Level (Range): normal
Water Type: clear
Fish Reported:
Rainbow Trout: Good
Brown Trout: Fair
water flow is back to normal and slightly murkey; fishing has been very good within the park; the best fishing times are the first couple of hours shortly after the morning whistle, as well as in the evening, but fish can be caught throughout the day if you change locations when fishing slows down; fish are biting very light so use a small float; very light line is key to success, 2-4 lb test is preferred; fish are hitting doughbaits in white, salmon peach, and hatchery brown colors when fished on a small treble hook and suspended under a float; Rooster Tails in black/white, green, brown, and purple; plastic worms in orange, yellow, white, and red have all been proving good; remember that all brown trout less than 15" in length must be returned to the water immediately; fishing times for the month of May are 6:30 a.m. - 8:15 p.m.; Fishing times for the month of June are 6:30 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.
(Reported on: 5/23/17)

Montauk State Park


Information: 573-548-2585
Water Surface Temp: 56º
Water Level (Range): falling
Water Type: clear
Fish Reported:
Rainbow Trout: Good
the river is at 2.61 feet; stocking has resumed in select locations throughout the park; fish are being caught throughout the park in all zones; olive streamers are effective in the fly-only zone; gold tencil jigs and any color doughbait have been effective in all other areas; for up-to-date stream conditions, check USGS water data website at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?07064440.
(Reported on: 5/23/17)

Roaring River State Park


Information: 417-847-2430
Water Surface Temp: 58º
Water Level (Range): falling
Water Type: dingy
Fish Reported:
Rainbow Trout: Good
we received three inches of rain this weekend and experienced another flood event, the river came up about four feet; little damage was done to the stream but the water has returned to a very dingy color; the dry fly fishing will slowly come back; right now we are fishing dark wooly buggers, prince nymphs, copper johns, lightning bugs, small gold jigs, small thread jigs, and brassies, with large dry flies taking a few here and there; the fish are still reacting to a hopper or beetle, in some areas, where there is a bit of slow water, glo balls, and the San Juan worms in bright orange and red are also working; buggers with extra mylar in the tails are working good, use 5x and 6x; the water is still up a bit and the use of Power Bait is recommended if you just want to catch a fast limit of trout, the orange, fluorescent yellow and white are all good in the eggs; if you are using the worms, the orange peel, orange, cheese yellow, and chartreuse are all working; small gold spoons are good if you fish them deep and slow; small spinnerbaits still work fine, you may need to add a bit of lead to get them down deep enough; jigs are catching fish, 1/32 and larger are best, but a few people have been catching trout on the white and olive micro jig; larger jigs are working best, in the darker colors, olive, black, black/yellow, and dark brown have all been working well; in this type of water the use of 4 lb. and 3 lb. line is recommended; as the water clears, we will go back to the 2 lb. line; if you go into Zone 3, nightcrawlers and minnows would be good choices or any of the bright-colored Power Baits should work.
(Reported on: 5/23/17)

Trout Stocking

Trout Stocking
The Conservation Department stocks trout in each of the trout parks every evening from the day before the March 1 opener through Oct. 30. Tag sale estimates determine a daily stocking rate average of 2.25 fish per expected angler. Except on opening day, three fish are stocked for every expected angler. From March 1 to Oct. 31, the parks will collectively sell more than 400,000 tags and stock more than 900,000 fish. These fish will average about 12 inches long over the season, but some variation occurs. Dozens of lunkers weighing upwards of 3 pounds are stocked each year. A few tip the scales at more than 10 pounds.

 

May 12, 2017 - White River - Submitted by Berry Brothers Guides - JOHN BERRY FISHING REPORT 5/12/2017

During the past week, we have had a several rain event (about a half inch here in Cotter), warm temperatures and moderate winds. The lake level at Bull Shoals rose three and six tenths feet to rest at thirty and four tenths feet above seasonal power pool of 660.57 feet. This is two and eight tenths feet below the top of flood pool. Upstream, Table Rock fell five tenths of a foot to rest at fourteen and three tenths feet above seasonal power pool and one and one tenth feet above the top of flood pool. The Corps of Engineers has opened several flood gates to release an additional 13,800 cubic feet per second in an effort to lower the lake. Beaver Lake fell six tenths of a foot to rest at seven and two tenths feet above seasonal power pool and one and four tenths feet below the top of flood pool. The Corps of Engineers has closed the flood gates and returned the dam to normal generation. On the White, we had no wadable water with more generation. Norfork Lake fell two and seven tenths feet to rest at twenty and nine tenths feet above seasonal power pool of 555.32 feet and two and eight tenths feet below the top of flood pool. The Corps of Engineers has closed the flood gates and returned the dam to normal generation.  On the Norfork, we had no wadable water.

Seasonal power pool has been reset for the lakes in the White River system. All of the lakes in the White River System are now below the top of flood pool. We should expect a lot of generation with little if any wadable water in the near future.

On the White, the water below Crooked Creek and the Buffalo has cleared up some. The hot flies were olive woolly buggers (#8, #10), Y2Ks (#14, #12), prince nymphs (#14), zebra midges (black with silver wire and silver bead or red with silver wire and silver bead #16, #18), pheasant tails (#14), ruby midges (#18), root beer midges (#18), pink and cerise San Juan worms (#10), and sowbugs (#16). Double fly nymph rigs have been very effective (my current favorite is a hare and copper nymph (#14) with a ruby midge (#18) suspended below it).

Caddis season is on the wane. This is our best hatch of the year and it is going fast. Before the hatch when the trout are feeding on the surface but you see no insects use a soft hackle like my green butt or a partridge and orange. When the trout begin to target insects, on the surface of the water, switch over to an elk hair caddis. Match your fly to the hatching insect based on size, shape and color.

The Buffalo National River and Crooked Creek are not navigable. With the warmer weather the smallmouths should be more active. My favorite fly is a Clouser minnow. Carefully check the water level before entering Crooked Creek or the Buffalo River. There are no dams on these streams. They both have large drainages and are prone to flooding during and following any rain event. The water can rise very quickly.

There was flooding but the river is back in its banks and the flood gates have been closed. Navigate this stream with caution as things have changed a bit during the recent flooding. The most productive flies have been small midge patterns (#18, #20, #22)  like ruby midges, root beer midges, zebra midges (black or red with silver wire and silver bead) and soft hackles (#14, #16) like the green butt. Egg patterns have also been productive. Double fly nymph rigs have been very effective. Try a small bead headed nymph (zebra midge, copper John or pheasant tail) suspended eighteen inches below a brightly colored San Juan worm (hot fluorescent pink or cerise #10). The fishing is better in the morning. My favorite rig has been a hare and copper nymph with a ruby midge dropper.

Dry Run Creek has been affected by the flooding but has returned to its banks. The hot flies have been sowbugs (#14), Y2Ks (#12) and various colored San Juan worms (worm brown, red, hot fluorescent pink and cerise #10). While you are at the creek you should visit the Norfork National Fish Hatchery. It is fascinating. Be sure and remove your waders before entering to prevent the spread of aquatic diseases.

The Spring River is high and off color. This is a great place to wade fish, when they are running water on the White and Norfork Rivers. Canoe season is over and there are fewer boats on the river. Be sure to wear cleated boots and carry a wading staff. There is a lot of bedrock that can get very slick. The hot flies have been olive woolly buggers with a bit of flash (#10), cerise and hot pink San Juan worms (#10) and Y2Ks (#10).

Remember that the White and Norfork Rivers and Dry Run Creek are infected with didymo, an invasive alga. Be sure and thoroughly clean and dry your waders (especially the felt soles on wading boots) before using them in any other water. Many manufacturers are now making rubber soled wading boots that are easier to clean and are not as likely to harbor didymo.

John Berry is a fly fishing guide in Cotter, Arkansas and has fished our local streams for over thirty years.

20170506010127_IMG_2614May 11, 2017 - Norfork and White RiverDally's Ozark Fly Fisher -

Carolyn Hardin with a tall Bull Shoals brown last weekend: image from guide Steve Dally

Well, with all this warm weather and sunshine its hard to believe that less than two weeks ago we were experiencing a very serious rain event. As of Wednesday, Table Rock was still releasing a combined spillway/turbine release of around 24,000 cfs which does continue to slowly raise Bull Shoals lake level. However, whether or not the spillway gates will need to be opened or if there will simply be an increase in the turbine release has (to my knowledge) yet to be determined.

As would be expected, there have been a number of folks calling the shop asking about water conditions. Well, the truth of the matter is that the White has been, and continues to, fish great! Also, as Crooked Creek and the Buffalo have continued to drop and clear, it has increased the amount of fishable water below the confluences. So, if you have any questions, just call, or better yet, come by the shop.

Again, Crooked Creek and the Buffalo have dropped quite significantly, but are not quite to the optimal wading stage yet. At the rate that they are both dropping out, we should see some great float/wade water within the coming days.

And just as Steve wrote in last weeks report, our guides continue, just as they always do, to work hard and put their clients onto some great Ozark fish!

20170504214520_IMG_2570Lance from California returned to the White River after a decade for this brown and 7 more: image from guide Steve Dally

With that, lets talk about what’s been working.

Michael Jr

White River:

With the clear water we now have, fish caddis and midges on the upper river. Devil Jigs, Prince Jigs, Fat Cadass, Pulsating Caddis, and Psycho Princes are great lead flies to Ruby Midges and Wotton Super Midges.

San Juan Worms and egg setup are worth while with some creeks inflow still adding a tint to the water.

When we see flows over 7,000 cfs, try throwing streamers such as CJ’s Sluggo, Dally’s Twerkin Minnow, Schmidt’s Double Deceiver, Lafkas’ Super Cougar, and Pierce’s Cheech Leech.

There is going to be some solid streamer fishing to come with some consistent flows in the offing later this summer.

20170510_201513.jpgRobin Brewer with a great White River rainbow. Guide: Gabe Levin.

Norfork:

The floodgates have again been turned off, but the Norfork Dam will continue to generate wide open until the inflow to the lake falls further. As of now, there is no word on when the Corps of Engineers ramp at Quarry Park, or the AGFC ramp at the confluence will be cleared.

 

 

 

Missouri Trout Parks May 11, 2017

Bennett Spring State Park


Information: Park 417-532-4418
Water Surface Temp: 61º
Water Level (Range): normal
Water Type: dingy
Fish Reported:
Rainbow Trout: Good
Brown Trout: Fair
zone 1 and 2 popular lures: shell and white, black and yellow, or black marabou, Bennett Blue crackleback, John Deere mini jig, brown or Easter egg glo ball; Zone 3 popular baits: yellow or salmon peach Power Baits, florescent pink worms, florescent orange grubs Power Bait; May fishing hours are from 6:30 a.m. to 8:15 p.m.; May weed cutting is scheduled for May 24-25; cutting will begin in Zone 3 and move upstream; remember that all brown trout less than 15" in length must be returned to the water immediately; for up-to-date stream conditions check USGS water data website at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?06923500; trout cam - https://mostateparks.com/content/trout-cam; Kids Free Fishing Day is rescheduled for Saturday June 10th. Kids 15 years old and younger fish for free within the park. Fishing is from 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Exhibits are from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00p.m.; For more information, please contact Bennett Spring Hatchery at 417-532-4418.
(Reported on: 5/10/17)

Maramec Spring Park


Information: 573-265-7801
Water Surface Temp: 57º
Water Level (Range): falling
Water Type: dingy
Fish Reported:
Rainbow Trout: Good
Brown Trout: Fair
water flow is high and murky from recent rains; fishing has been very good with numerous 15"+ fish being caught regularly; the best fishing times are the first couple of hours shortly after the morning whistle, as well as in the evening, but fish can be caught throughout the day if you change locations when fishing slows down; fish are biting very light so use a small float; very light line is key to success, 2-4 lb test is preferred; fish are hitting doughbaits in white, salmon peach, and hatchery brown colors when fished on a small treble hook and suspended under a float; Rooster Tails in black/white, green, brown, and purple; plastic worms in orange, yellow, white, and red have all been proving good; remember that all brown trout less than 15" in length must be returned to the water immediately; fishing times for the month of May are 6:30 a.m. - 8:15 p.m.; Kid's Free Fishing Day is May 20th.
(Reported on: 5/10/17)

Montauk State Park


Information: 573-548-2585
Water Surface Temp: 56º
Water Level (Range): falling
Water Type: dingy
Fish Reported:
Rainbow Trout: Good
the river is at 3 feet and Dingy; it is falling from historic levels experienced during flooding; fish are being call throughout the park in all zones; olive streamers are effective in the fly-only zone; gold tencil jigs and any color doughbait have been effective in all other areas; for up-to-date stream conditions, check USGS water data website at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?07064440.
(Reported on: 5/10/17)

Roaring River State Park


Information: 417-847-2430
Water Surface Temp: 58º
Water Level (Range): falling
Water Type: dingy
Fish Reported:
Rainbow Trout: Good
the river is coming back to normal and is about 1’ above normal; the water has become more clear in the last week but still has a dingy color; the dry fly fishing will slowly come back; right now we are fishing dark wooly buggers, prince nymphs, copper johns, lightning bugs, small gold jigs, small thread jigs, and brassies, with large dry flies taking a few here and there; the fish are still reacting to a hopper or beetle, in some areas, where there is a bit of slow water, glo balls, and the San Juan worms in bright orange and red are also working; buggers with extra mylar in the tails are working good, use 5x and 6x; the water is still up a bit and the use of Power Bait is recommended if you just want to catch a fast limit of trout, the orange, fluorescent yellow and white are all good in the eggs; if you are using the worms, the orange peel, orange, cheese yellow, and chartreuse are all working; small gold spoons are good if you fish them deep and slow; small spinnerbaits still work fine, you may need to add a bit of lead to get them down deep enough; jigs are catching fish, 1/32 and larger are best, but a few people have been catching trout on the white and olive micro jig; larger jigs are working best, in the darker colors, olive, black, black/yellow, and dark brown have all been working well; in this type of water the use of 4 lb. and 3 lb. line is recommended; as the water clears, we will go back to the 2 lb. line; if you go into Zone 3, nightcrawlers and minnows would be good choices or any of the bright-colored Power Baits should work.
(Reported on: 5/9/17)

Trout Stocking

Trout Stocking

The Conservation Department stocks trout in each of the trout parks every evening from the day before the March 1 opener through Oct. 30. Tag sale estimates determine a daily stocking rate average of 2.25 fish per expected angler. Except on opening day, three fish are stocked for every expected angler. From March 1 to Oct. 31, the parks will collectively sell more than 400,000 tags and stock more than 900,000 fish. These fish will average about 12 inches long over the season, but some variation occurs. Dozens of lunkers weighing upwards of 3 pounds are stocked each year. A few tip the scales at more than 10 pounds.

May 5, 2017 - White River - Submitted by Berry Brothers Guides - JOHN BERRY FISHING REPORT 5/05/2017

During the past week, we have had several rain events (combined for five inches here in Cotter, which included a flash flood watch), warm temperatures and heavy winds (to include lake wind advisories). The lake level at Bull Shoals rose twenty two and two tenths feet to rest at twenty six and nine tenths feet above seasonal power pool of 660.57 feet. This is seven and six tenths feet below the top of flood pool. Upstream, Table Rock rose twelve and two tenths feet to rest at fifteen and six tenths feet above seasonal power pool and six tenths of a foot above the top of flood pool. The Corps of Engineers has opened several flood gates to release an additional 13,800 cubic feet per second in an effort to lower the lake. Beaver Lake rose two and seven tenths feet to rest at eight feet above seasonal power pool and six tenths of a foot below the top of flood pool. The Corps of Engineers has opened several flood gates to release an additional 3,700 cubic feet per second in an effort to lower the lake. On the White, we had no wadable water with some generation. Norfork Lake rose nine feet to rest at six and seven tenths feet above seasonal power pool of 555.32 feet and one tenth of a foot below the top of flood pool. The Corps of Engineers has opened several flood gates to release an additional 6,600 cubic feet per second in an effort to lower the lake. On the Norfork, we had no wadable water.

Seasonal power pool has been reset for the lakes in the White River system. All of the lakes in the White River System are over or near the top of flood pool. We should expect a lot of generation with little if any wadable water in the near future.

On the White, the water below Crooked Creek and the Buffalo is high and muddy. There has been some flooding. The hot flies were olive woolly buggers (#8, #10), Y2Ks (#14, #12), prince nymphs (#14), zebra midges (black with silver wire and silver bead or red with silver wire and silver bead #16, #18), pheasant tails (#14), ruby midges (#18), root beer midges (#18), pink and cerise San Juan worms (#10), and sowbugs (#16). Double fly nymph rigs have been very effective (my current favorite is a hare and copper nymph (#14) with a ruby midge (#18) suspended below it).

Caddis season is on the wane. This is our best hatch of the year and it is still here. I fished the caddis hatch on the Norfork, with great success. Before the hatch when the trout are feeding on the surface but you see no insects use a soft hackle like my green butt or a partridge and orange. When the trout begin to target insects, on the surface of the water, switch over to an elk hair caddis. Match your fly to the hatching insect based on size, shape and color.

The Buffalo National River and Crooked Creek are at flood and are not navigable. With the warmer weather the smallmouths should be more active. My favorite fly is a Clouser minnow. Carefully check the water level before entering Crooked Creek or the Buffalo River. There are no dams on these streams. They both have large drainages and are prone to flooding during and following any rain event. The water can rise very quickly.

There has been flooding on the Norfork and the river level is quite high due to the flood gates being open in an effort to drop the lake level. The ramps have been closed due to flooding and debris on them. Navigate this stream with extreme caution. The most productive flies have been small midge patterns (#18, #20, #22)  like ruby midges, root beer midges, zebra midges (black or red with silver wire and silver bead) and soft hackles (#14, #16) like the green butt. Egg patterns have also been productive. Double fly nymph rigs have been very effective. Try a small bead headed nymph (zebra midge, copper John or pheasant tail) suspended eighteen inches below a brightly colored San Juan worm (hot fluorescent pink or cerise #10). The fishing is better in the morning. My favorite rig has been a hare and copper nymph with a ruby midge dropper.

 

Dry Run Creek has been affected by the flooding but has returned to its banks. The hot flies have been sowbugs (#14), Y2Ks (#12) and various colored San Juan worms (worm brown, red, hot fluorescent pink and cerise #10). While you are at the creek you should visit the Norfork National Fish Hatchery. It is fascinating. Be sure and remove your waders before entering to prevent the spread of aquatic diseases.

The Spring River is high and off color. This is a great place to wade fish, when they are running water on the White and Norfork Rivers. Canoe season is over and there are fewer boats on the river. Be sure to wear cleated boots and carry a wading staff. There is a lot of bedrock that can get very slick. The hot flies have been olive woolly buggers with a bit of flash (#10), cerise and hot pink San Juan worms (#10) and Y2Ks (#10).

Remember that the White and Norfork Rivers and Dry Run Creek are infected with didymo, an invasive alga. Be sure and thoroughly clean and dry your waders (especially the felt soles on wading boots) before using them in any other water. Many manufacturers are now making rubber soled wading boots that are easier to clean and are not as likely to harbor didymo.

John Berry is a fly fishing guide in Cotter, Arkansas and has fished our local streams for over thirty years.

April 28, 2017 - White River - Submitted by Berry Brothers Guides - JOHN BERRY FISHING REPORT 4/28/2017

During the past week, we have had several rain events (combined for five inches here in Cotter, with more on the way to include a flash flood watch), warm temperatures and heavy winds (to include lake wind advisories). The lake level at Bull Shoals rose nine feet to rest at six and three tenths feet above seasonal power pool of 659 feet. This is twenty nine and eight tenths feet below the top of flood pool. Upstream, Table Rock rose six and four tenths feet to rest at four and four tenths feet above seasonal power pool and eleven and six tenths feet below the top of flood pool. Beaver Lake rose nine feet to rest at six and three tenths feet above seasonal power pool and three and three tenths feet below the top of flood pool. On the White, we had wadable water with some generation. Norfork Lake rose nine feet to rest at six and seven tenths feet above seasonal power pool of 553.75 feet and nineteen and six tenths feet below the top of flood pool. On the Norfork, we had less generation with more wadable water.

Seasonal power pool has been reset for the lakes in the White River system. All of the lakes in the White River System are over power pool and rising. We should expect a lot of generation with little if any wadable water in the near future.

On the White, the bite has been spotty. Some days have been excellent and some poor. The hot spot has been the Rim Shoals. We have had more wadable water. The hot flies were olive woolly buggers (#8, #10), Y2Ks (#14, #12), prince nymphs (#14), zebra midges (black with silver wire and silver bead or red with silver wire and silver bead #16, #18), pheasant tails (#14), ruby midges (#18), root beer midges (#18), pink and cerise San Juan worms (#10), and sowbugs (#16). Double fly nymph rigs have been very effective (my current favorite is a hare and copper nymph (#14) with a ruby midge (#18) suspended below it). The water below Crooked Creek and the Buffalo River is high and heavily stained.

Caddis season is on the wane. This is our best hatch of the year and it is still here. I fished the caddis hatch on the Norfork, with great success. Before the hatch when the trout are feeding on the surface but you see no insects use a soft hackle like my green butt or a partridge and orange. When the trout begin to target insects, on the surface of the water, switch over to an elk hair caddis. Match your fly to the hatching insect based on size, shape and color.

The Buffalo National River and Crooked Creek are at flood and are not navigable. With the warmer weather the smallmouths should be more active. My favorite fly is a Clouser minnow. Carefully check the water level before entering Crooked Creek or the Buffalo River. There are no dams on these streams. They both have large drainages and are prone to flooding during and following any rain event. The water can rise very quickly.

There has been more wadable water on the Norfork and it has fished a bit better particularly if you can catch the caddis hatch. The most productive flies have been small midge patterns (#18, #20, #22)  like ruby midges, root beer midges, zebra midges (black or red with silver wire and silver bead) and soft hackles (#14, #16) like the green butt. Egg patterns have also been productive. Double fly nymph rigs have been very effective. Try a small bead headed nymph (zebra midge, copper John or pheasant tail) suspended eighteen inches below a brightly colored San Juan worm (hot fluorescent pink or cerise #10). There have been reliable hatches of small midges (try a size 24 Adams parachute) and caddis (try a size 16 elk hair caddis). The fishing is better in the morning. My favorite rig has been a hare and copper nymph with a ruby midge dropper.

Dry Run Creek has been very crowded due to spring break. The hot flies have been sowbugs (#14), Y2Ks (#12) and various colored San Juan worms (worm brown, red, hot fluorescent pink and cerise #10). While you are at the creek you should visit the Norfork National Fish Hatchery. It is fascinating. Be sure and remove your waders before entering to prevent the spread of aquatic diseases.

The Spring River is high and off color. This is a great place to wade fish, when they are running water on the White and Norfork Rivers. Canoe season is over and there are fewer boats on the river. Be sure to wear cleated boots and carry a wading staff. There is a lot of bedrock that can get very slick. The hot flies have been olive woolly buggers with a bit of flash (#10), cerise and hot pink San Juan worms (#10) and Y2Ks (#10).

Remember that the White and Norfork Rivers and Dry Run Creek are infected with didymo, an invasive alga. Be sure and thoroughly clean and dry your waders (especially the felt soles on wading boots) before using them in any other water. Many manufacturers are now making rubber soled wading boots that are easier to clean and are not as likely to harbor didymo.

John Berry is a fly fishing guide in Cotter, Arkansas and has fished our local streams for over thirty years.

October 7, 2015 - Norfork and White River - Submitted by Dally's Ozark Fly Fisher

Rick Brown with 22-inch brown from NorforkRick Brown with his personal best – a healthy 22″ brown from the Norfork. Gabe Levin guiding.

 


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